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SYNTHETIC ICE Rink

KwikRink has officially released its 5th generation formula. We call our latest formula, KwikRink V (KwikRink 5). This new formula has a dry slip agent throughout the panel, and requires no topical sprays or liquids. KwikRink V will change the perceptions of current industry limitations. The most common consumer complaints in the industry have to do with; surface glide, backwards skating and transitioning, and oily panels.

Surface Glide

One of the most common complaints about synthetic ice is that it doesn’t glide anything like real ice. You can YouTube countless videos of people skating on “synthetic ice”, but it looks more like they are walking with skates on. KwikRink V has a surface glide of up to 50 plus feet with just one stride. Check out the video here.

Backwards Skating and Transitioning

The next most common issue regarding synthetic ice has to do with backwards skating and transitioning. These skills have had a very unnatural feel across the industry, and are entirely impossible on some of the surfaces out there – until now. Again, if you aren’t buying it – check out the video here. KwikRink V is the closest synthetic surface to ice, made to date.

Oily Panels

There are other fully/self lubricated panels on today’s market. These panels do not require any type of topical spray. The problem with the majority of these panels is that the slip agent will migrate out over time, rendering the surface a dead cutting board within a few years. This leaves you with an oily surface that eventually turns into a useless piece of plastic. KwikRink V’s slip agent is completely dry and will not migrate outside of the panel.

KwikRink is proud to be one of the few manufacturers of synthetic ice in the entire world. This allows us infinite quality control over our surfaces. Many companies selling synthetic ice purchase cheaply made plastic from China for resale. We brought this product to the hockey market over 20 years ago. We know hockey. We know synthetic ice. The best comes from the pioneers of the industry.

13
September

Goalie Training on KwikRink

Posted by KwikRink
Goalie Training on KwikRink

KwikRink synthetic ice has been an extremely popular tool for goalie training at all levels. Professional and amateur goaltenders regularly use KwikRink to supplement their on ice training. The surface allows goalies to practice slides, and all the skills that they would on real ice at a fraction of the cost. Many goaltenders will install KwikRink synthetic ice in their own home to create an unparalleled home ice advantage when it comes to training.

KwikRink is featured in many goalie training camps around the country. MEGA Goaltending, a Minnesota based goalie training camp, has used KwikRink as part of their training regimen for several years. MEGA consists of highly experienced staff members working with a small group of goalies to offer a truly in depth goalie training experience. A synthetic ice area with two creases was recently installed at Elk River Ice Arena to add to their arsenal of training tools.

“KwikRink has become a proven and invaluable surface for us to use when working with our goaltenders. We have found KwikRink to be the ideal surface for us to train our goalies on save techniques and receive a ton of repetitions. It also allows us to keep the costs down for families, in comparison to the cost of training on ice. We have trained over a thousand goalies on KwikRink synthetic ice, and the results have been fantastic.”

– Justin Johnson, Founder of MEGA Goaltending and Minnesota Golden Gophers Men’s Goalie Coach

The first synthetic ice crease was created by KwikRink in the late 90’s. Many residential clients will install their own goalie school inside their homes. The ideal setup has a permanent inset goalie crease, providing positional guidance, and has the depth and width to work on shots at all angles. An ideal goalie area would be something like 16 feet wide by 24 feet long. This would allow the goalie to work on common angles, as well as, taking screened shots. Many of these clients do not have this kinda of space in their home to dedicate to hockey training. You can still get a lot out of a goalie area with limited space. The minimum area would be 10-12 feet wide by about 16 feet long. This would still provide room to practice slides, and work at head on shots. When it comes to training, nothing compares to getting in your skates and doing the work.

 

28
March

Small Area Games

Posted by KwikRink
Small Area Games

Many of our clients buy rinks for their basement or garage, which are typically small areas and only have so much space available. Often times they worry whether the rink will offer enough space for their kids to practice skills and have fun with friends. The majority will quickly find that the KwikRink surface, regardless of size, has improved their kids skills in an immense way.

Practicing skills in small areas can be a blast for kids, simply because it doesn’t feel like practice. It’s like that vegetable you slip in their fruit smoothies that they can’t even taste, but they still receive the benefit from it being there. Kids have many options when it comes to small area games, and most just come naturally. Some examples of these games would be; 1 on 1, 2 on 2, 3 on 3, keep away, or stick handling games a lot like what you see in the picture above with NHL superstar, Patrick Kane. All of these small area games are going to translate to a noticeably improved skill-set on game-day.

One of the main areas most kids will improve upon is their hands. When working with a smaller area, you must learn to handle the puck with quick hands protect the puck using your body and stick angles intelligently. Another vastly improved skill is quickness, both physically and mentally. In tight areas, players are required to process thought and act in a lightning quick manner.

“It’s very important to learn how to play in tight areas. We still do drills to this day that are tight area games where it’s 2-on-2, 3-on-3 down low, maybe 1-on-1 in the corners. They teach you how to battle and how to maneuver in tight space.”

– Patrick Kane on Small Area Games